Home News Is RUNNING ON CONCRETE / PAVEMENT HARMFUL FOR MY KNEES

Is RUNNING ON CONCRETE / PAVEMENT HARMFUL FOR MY KNEES

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Running is a sore sport. Sometimes our feet, muscles, ankles, knees, and feet hurt. Soreness can be a sign that you have done a hard workout. However, excessive soreness or pain can indicate a problem. Non-runners constantly tell runners that running is bad on the knees. Many runners suffer from knee pain, despite evidence to the contrary. Running is a sport that involves running. Your knees absorb a lot of the shock from each step. The first step to fixing knee pain is diagnosing it. While you can examine your concrete shoes, your stride and the health of your bones, connective tissue, and your shoes, what about your running surfaces?

This article will discuss knee pain and running on concrete and pavement. While there is much debate over whether or not you should be running on them, many people have to do it. We’ve also included other tips to help prevent knee pain. You should now have a plan in place to deal with any knee pain that you may experience.

SHOULD I RUIN ON HARD SURFACES

The short answer to this question is yes. The truth is that it’s not clear whether should be run on concrete, asphalt, or pavement. Let’s look at the pros and con’s of each.

Hard surfaces can be more painful for some runners, particularly as they age. However, you may not feel this as much if your running is younger.

WHY IS IT OKAY TO RUNN ON HARD SURFACES?

Running on hard surfaces shouldn’t be a problem, as humans have shock absorption built into their running. It does not come from your shoes, but you will see the term “shock absorption”, in Google searches related to concrete shoes guide.

One group of researchers discovered that running shoes’ cushioning had decreased by 1/3 after 150 miles of loading. This means that shock absorption primarily comes from you! Your foot, ankle and knees as well as your hips.

In the first step runners adjust to new surfaces. This means that we are great at adapting our shock absorption to accommodate different surfaces.

Running form is also important, as it is with many injuries. Running form can have a greater impact on knee injuries than the surface. Before you avoid hard surfaces, make sure to first check your form. This might help you run faster and fix your pain.

WHY YOU SHOULD NOT RUNNING ON HARD SURFACES

Hard surfaces cause more joint impact. One study showed that peak pressure, which is the highest pressure on the foot, was approximately 12 percent higher on asphalt than grass. This is because asphalt–concrete are even more difficult.

Even if you have a good running form and your joint impact on hard surfaces is low, they can still feel painful. Even if the problem is psychological, it’s best to be cautious about running on them.

Softer surfaces also increase ground contact time so your body can distribute impact more effectively. This applies to all soft surfaces, from grass to sand. However, the latter falls under its own category and can pose problems.

Sand is a soft surface that is less impactful than other surfaces, but it is still more difficult to run on due to its instability.

Instead of being a smoother surface like grass, the sand absorbs more force than grass. This makes it harder to pick up your foot again and can make it difficult for your foot and ankle to remain stable.

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